How To Move MySQL Data Directory On A Separate Partition

Prerequisite: A free partition that will serve as a dedicated MySQL partition.

Note: These instructions assume that the partition you wish to mount is /dev/sdc1

  1. Backup all MySQL databases
    Code:
    mysqldump --opt --all-databases | gzip > /home/alldatabases.sql.gz
  2. Stop tailwatchd and the mysql (tailwatchd monitors services, so disable it to prevent it from prematurely restarting mysql)
    Code:
    /scripts/restartsrv_tailwatchd --stop
    /scripts/restartsrv_mysql --stop
  3. Backup the MySQL data directory in case something goes awry
    Code:
    mv /var/lib/mysql /var/lib/mysql.backup
  4. Create the new mount point
    Code:
    mkdir /var/lib/mysql
  5. Configure /etc/fstab so that the new partition is mounted when the server boots (adjust values as necessary)
    Code:
    echo "/dev/sdc1     /var/lib/mysql     ext3     defaults,usrquota    0 1" >> /etc/fstab
  6. Mount the new partition. The following command will mount everything in /etc/fstab:
    Code:
    mount -a
  7. Change the ownership of the mount point so that it is accessible to the user “mysql”
    Code:
    chown mysql:mysql /var/lib/mysql
  8. Ensure that the permissions of the mount point are correct
    Code:
    chmod 711 /var/lib/mysql
  9. Start mysql and tailwatchd
    Code:
    /scripts/restartsrv_mysql --start
    /scripts/restartsrv_tailwatchd --start
  10. Ensure that the MySQL data directory is mounted correctly:
    Code:
    mount |grep /var/lib/mysql
  11. You should see a line that looks like this:
    /dev/sdc1 on /var/lib/mysql type ext3 (rw,usrquota)

Source

How To Back Up Your MySQL Databases

MySQL is an open source relational database management system (DBMS) which is frequently deployed in a wide assortment of contexts. Most frequently it is deployed as part of the LAMP Stack. The database system is also easy to use and highly portable and is, in the context of many applications, extremely efficient. As MySQL is often a centralized data store for large amounts of mission critical data, making regular backups of your MySQL database is one of the most important disaster recovery tasks a system administrator can perform. This guide addresses a number of distinct methods for creating back ups of your database as well as restoring databases from backups.

 

Backup Methodology

Most backups of MySQL databases in this guide are performed using the mysqldump tool, which is distributed with the default MySQL server installation. We recommend that you use mysqldumpwhenever possible because it is often the easiest and most efficient way to take database backups. Other methods detailed in this guide are provided for situations when you do not have access to the mysqldump tool, as in a recovery environment like Finnix or in situations where the local instance of the MySQL server will not start.

Nevertheless, this guide provides a mere overview of the mysqldump tool, as there are many options for and uses of mysqldump that fall beyond the scope of this document. We encourage you to become familiar with all of the procedures covered in this document, and to continue your exploration of mysqldump beyond the cases described here. Be sure to note the following:

  • The *.sql files created with mysqldump can be restored at any time. You can even edit the database .sql files manually (with great care!) using your favorite text editor.
  • If your databases only make use of the MyISAM storage engine, you can substitute the mysqldump command with the faster mysqlhotcopy.

 

Creating Backups of the Entire Database Management System (DBMS)

It is often necessary to take a back up (or “dump”) of an entire database management system along with all databases and tables, including the system databases which hold the users, permissions and passwords.

Option 1: Create Backups of an Entire Database Management System Using the mysqldump Utility

The most straight forward method for creating a single coherent backup of the entire MySQL database management system uses the mysqldump utility from the command line. The syntax for creating a database dump with a current timestamp is as follows:

1
mysqldump --all-databases > dump-$( date '+%Y-%m-%d_%H-%M-%S' ).sql -u root -p

This command will prompt you for a password before beginning the database backup in the current directory. This process can take anywhere from a few seconds to a few hours depending on the size of your databases.

Automate this process by adding a line to crontab:

1
0 1 * * * /usr/bin/mysqldump --all-databases > dump-$( date '+%Y-%m-%d_%H-%M-%S' ).sql -u root -pPASSWORD

For the example above, use which mysqldump to confirm the correct path to the command, and replace root with the mysql user you would like to run backups as, and PASSWORD with the correct password for that user.

In the crontab example, ensure that there is no space between the -P flag, and your password entry.

Option 2: Create Backups of an Entire DBMS Using Copies of the MySQL Data Directory

While the mysqldump tool is the preferred backup method, there are a couple of cases that require a different approach. mysqldump only works when the database server is accessible and running. If the database cannot be started or the host system is inaccessible, we can copy MySQL’s database directly. This method is often necessary in situations where you only have access to a recovery environment like Finnix with your system’s disks mounted in that file system. If you’re attempting this method on your system itself, ensure that the database is not running. Issue a command that resembles the following:

1
/etc/init.d/mysqld stop

On most distribution’s version of MySQL, the data directory is located in the /var/lib/mysql/directory. If this directory doesn’t exist examine the /etc/mysql/my.cnf file for a path to the data directory. Alternatively, you can search your file system for the data directory by issuing the following command:

1
find / -name mysql

Once you have located your MySQL data directory you can copy it to a backup location. The following example assumes that the MySQL data directory is located at /var/lib/mysql/:

1
cp -R /var/lib/mysql/* /opt/database/backup-1266871069/

In this case, we have recursively copied the contents of the data directory (e.g. /var/lib/mysql/) to a directory within the /opt/ hierarchy (e.g. /opt/database/backup-1266871069/). This directory must exist before initiating the copy operation. Consider the following sequence of operations:

1
2
3
/etc/init.d/mysql stop
mkdir -p /opt/database/backup-1266872202/
cp -R /var/lib/mysql/* /opt/database/backup-1266872202/

These commands begin by stopping the MySQL server daemon, then creating a directory named /opt/database/backup-1266872202/, and performing a recursive copy of the data directory. Note that we’ve chosen to use the backup-[time_t] naming convention for our examples. Substitute the paths’ above for your preferred organization and naming scheme. The cp command does not produce output and can take some time to complete depending on the size of your database. Do not be alarmed if it takes a while to complete. When the copy operation is finished, you may want to archive the data directory into a “tar” archive to make it easier to manage and move between machines. Issue the following commands to create the archive:

1
2
cd /opt/database/backup-1266872202
tar -czfv * > /opt/mysqlBackup-1266872202.tar.gz 

Once the tarball is created, you can easily transfer the file in the manner that is most convenient for you. Don’t forget to restart the MySQL server daemon again if needed:

1
/etc/init.d/mysql start

Creating Backups of a Single Database

In many cases, creating a back up of the entire database server isn’t required. In some cases such as upgrading a web application, the installer may recommend making a backup of the database in case the upgrade adversely affects the database. Similarly, if you want to create a “dump” of a specific database to move that database to a different server, you might consider the following method.

When possible, use the mysqldump tool to export a “dump” of a single database. This command will resemble the following:

1
mysqldump -u squire -ps3cr1t -h localhost danceLeaders > 1266861650-danceLeaders.sql

The above example is like the example in the previous section, except rather than using the --all-databases option, this example specifies a particular database name. In this case we create a back up of the danceLeaders database. The form of this command, in a more plain notation is as follows:

1
mysqldump -u [username] -p[password] -h [host] [databaseName] > [backup-name].sql

For an additional example, we will backup the database named customer using the root database account by issuing the following command:

1
mysqldump -u root -p -h localhost customer > customerBackup.sql

You will be prompted for a password before mysqldump begins it’s backup process. As always the backup file, in this case customerBackup.sql, is created in the directory where you issue this command. The mysqldump command can complete in a few seconds or a few hours depending on the size of the database and the load on the host when running the backup.

Creating Backups of a Single Table

Option 1: Create Backups of a Single Table Using the mysqldump Utility

This operation, like previous uses of the mysqldump utility in this document, allows you to create a backup of a single database table. Continuing our earlier examples the following example allows you to back up the table squireRecords in the danceLeaders database.

1
 mysqldump -u squire -ps3cr1t -h localhost danceLeaders squireRecords \> 1266861650-danceLeaders-squireRecords.sql

The above example is like the example in the previous section, except that we’ve added a table name specification to the command to specify the name of the table that we want to back up. The form of this command in a more plain notation is as follows:

1
mysqldump -u [username] -p[password] -h [host] [databaseName] [tableName] > [backup-name].sql

For an additional example, we will backup the table named “order” from the database named customer using the root database account by issuing the following command:

1
mysqldump -u root -p -h localhost customer order > customerBackup-order.sql

You will be prompted for a password before mysqldump begins its backup process. As always, the backup file (in this case customerBackup.sql) is created in the directory where you issue this command. The mysqldump command can complete in a few seconds or a few hours depending on the size of the database and the load on the host when running the backup.

Option 2: Create Backups of a Single Table Using the MySQL Client and an OUTFILE Statement

The MySQL client itself has some backup capability. It is useful when you are already logged in and you do not want to exit the current session. If you are using a live system and cannot afford down time, you should consider temporarily locking the table you’re backing up.

Do be aware that when backing up a single table using the MySQL client, that table’s structure is not maintained in the backup. Only the data itself is saved when using this method.

  1. Before we begin, we recommend performing a LOCK TABLES on the tables you intend to backup up, followed by FLUSH TABLES to ensure that the database is in a consistent space during the backup operation. You only need a read lock. This allows other clients to continue to query the tables while you are making a copy of the files in the MySQL data directory. For a “read” lock, the syntax of LOCK TABLES looks like the following:
    1
    LOCK TABLES tableName READ;
    

    To perform a LOCK TABLES on the order table of the customer database, issue the following command:

    1
    mysql -u root -p -h localhost
    

    You will then be prompted for the root password. Once you have entered the database credentials, you will arrive at the mysql client prompt. Issue the following command to lock the order table in the customer database (the trailing ; is required for MySQL commands):

    1
    2
    3
    USE customer;
    LOCK TABLES order READ;
    FLUSH TABLES;
    
  2. We can now begin the backup operation. To create a backup of a single table using the MySQL client, you will need to be logged in to your MySQL DBMS. If you are not currently logged in you may log in with the following command:
    1
     mysql -u root -p -h localhost
    

    You will be prompted for a password. Once you have entered the correct password and are at the MySQL client prompt, you can use a SELECT * INTO OUTFILE statement. The syntax of this statement looks like the following:

    1
     SELECT * INTO OUTFILE 'file_name' FROM tbl_name;
    

    In this example, we will create a backup of the data from the order table of the customerdatabase. Issue the following command to begin the backup procedure (the trailing ; is required for MySQL commands):

    1
    2
    3
    4
    5
     USE customer;
     LOCK TABLES order READ;
     FLUSH TABLES;
     SELECT * INTO OUTFILE 'customerOrderBackup.sql' FROM order;
     UNLOCK TABLES;
    

    The customerOrderBackup.sql file will be created in the appropriate data sub-directory within MySQLs data directory. The MySQL data directory is commonly /var/lib/mysql/. In this example, the OUTFILE will be /var/lib/mysql/customer/customerOrderBackup.sql. The location of this directory and file can, however, vary between Linux distributions. If you can not find your backup file, you can search for it with the following command:

    1
    find / -name customerOrderBackup.sql
    
  3. Once you have completed the backup operation, you will want to unlock the tables using the following command in the MySQL client. This will return your database to its normal operation. Log in to the MySQL client with the first command if you are not presently logged in and then issue the second command:
    1
    2
    3
    mysql -uroot -p -h localhost
    
    UNLOCK TABLES;
    

You can continue using your database as normal from this point.

Considerations for an Effective Backup Strategy

Creating backups of your MySQL database should be a regular and scheduled task. You might like to consider scheduling periodic backups using cronmysqldump and/or mail. Consider our documentation for more information regarding cron. Implementing an automated backup solution may help minimize down time in a disaster recovery situation.

You do not need to log in as root when backing up databases. A MySQL user with read (e.g. SELECT) permission is able to use both the mysqldump and mysql (e.g. the MySQL client) tools to take backups, as described below. As a matter of common practice, we recommend that you not use the MySQL root user whenever possible to minimize security risks.

You may want to consider incremental backups as part of a long-term database backup plan. While this process is not covered here, we recommend that you consider the MySQL Database Backup Methods resource for more information.

Restoring an Entire DBMS From Backup

A backup that cannot be restored is of minimal value. We recommend testing your backups regularly to ensure that they can be restored in the event that you may need to restore from backups. When using restoring backups of your MySQL database, the method you use depends on the method you used to create the backup in question.

Option 1: Restoring an Entire DBMS Using the MySQL Client and Backups Created by mysqldump

Before beginning the restoration process, this section assumes your system is running a newly installed version of MySQL without any existing databases or tables. If you already have databases and tables in your MySQL DBMS, please make a backup before proceeding as this process will overwrite current MySQL data.

You can easily restore your entire DBMS using the mysql command. The syntax for this will resemble the following:

1
mysql -u [username] -p [password] < backupFile.sql

In this case we’re simply restoring the entire DBMS. The command will look like the following:

1
mysql -u root -p < 1266861650-backup-all.sql

You will be prompted for the root MySQL user’s password. Once the correct credentials are supplied, the restoration process will begin. Since this process restores an entire DBMS, it can take anywhere from a few seconds to many hours.

Option 2: Restoring an Entire DBMS Using MySQL Data Files Copied Directly from MySQL’s Data Directory

Before beginning the restoration process, this section assumes your system is running a newly installed version of MySQL without any existing databases or tables. If you already have databases and tables in your MySQL DBMS, please make a backup before proceeding as this process will overwrite current MySQL data.

  1. If you have a complete backup of your MySQL data directory (commonly /var/lib/mysql), you can restore it from the command line. To ensure a successful restore, you must first stop the MySQL server daemon and delete the current data in the MySQL data directory.

    /etc/init.d/mysql stop rm -R /var/lib/mysql/*

  2. In the following example, the MySQL data directory backup is located in the /opt/database/backup-1266872202 directory. If you made a tarball of the data directory when you backed up your DBMS data directory, you will need to extract the files from the tarball before copying with the following commands:

    cp mysqlBackup-1266872202.tar.gz /var/lib/mysql/ cd /var/lib/mysql tar xzvf mysqlBackup-1266872202.tar.gz

  3. Before we can restart the MySQL database process, we must ensure that the permissions are set correctly on the /var/lib/mysql/ directory. For this example, we assume the MySQL server daemon runs as the user mysql with the group mysql. To change the permissions on the data directory issue the following command:

    chown -R mysql:mysql /var/lib/mysql

  4. Alter the mysql:mysql portion of this command if your MySQL instance runs with different user and group permissions. The form of this argument is [user]:[group]. Finally we can start the MySQL server daemon with the following command:
    1
     /etc/init.d/mysql start
    

    If you receive an error similar to the following:

    1
    2
     /usr/bin/mysqladmin: connect to server at 'localhost' failed
         error: 'Access denied for user 'debian-sys-maint'@'localhost' (using password: YES)'
    

    You’ll need to find the old debian-sys-maint user’s password in the /etc/mysql/debian.cnf and then change the new debian-sys-maint user’s password to it. You can view the old password using cat:

    1
     cat /etc/mysql/debian.cnf | grep password
    

    Copy (or remember) the password. Then you’ll need to change the new debian-sys-maint user’s password. You can do this by logging in as the MySQL root user and issuing the following command (where <password> is the password of the old debian-sys-maint user):

    1
     GRANT ALL PRIVILEGES ON *.* TO 'debian-sys-maint'@'localhost' IDENTIFIED BY '<password>' WITH GRANT OPTION;
    
  5. You’ll then need to restart MySQL with the following command:
    1
    /etc/init.d/mysql restart
    

After MySQL server has successfully started, you will want to test your MySQL DBMS and ensure that all databases and tables restored properly. We also recommend that you audit your logs for potential errors. In some cases MySQL can start successfully despite database errors.

Restoring a Single Database from Backup

In cases where you have only created a backup for one database, or only need to restore a single database, the restoration process is somewhat different.

Before beginning the restoration process, this section assumes your system is running a newly installed version of MySQL without any existing databases or tables. If you already have databases and tables in your MySQL DBMS, please make a backup before proceeding as this process will overwrite current MySQL data.

  1. To restore a single database using the mysql command, first prepare the destination database. Log in to your (new) MySQL database server using the MySQL client:
    1
     mysql -u root -p -h localhost
    
  2. You will be prompted for the root MySQL user’s password. After you have provided the correct credentials, you must create the destination database. In this case, the customer database will be restored:
    1
     CREATE DATABASE customer;
    
  3. As with all MySQL statements, do not omit the final semi-colon (e.g. ;) at the conclusion of each command. Depending on your deployment, you may need to create a new MySQL user or recreate a previous user with access to the newly created database. The command for creating a new MySQL user takes the following form:
    1
     CREATE USER '[username]'@'[host]' IDENTIFIED BY '[password]';
    
  4. In the next example, we will create a user named customeradmin:
    1
    CREATE USER 'customeradmin'@'localhost' IDENTIFIED BY 's3cr1t';
    
  5. Now we will give customeradmin privileges to access the customer database. The command for granting privileges to a database for a specific user takes the following form:
    1
     GRANT [privilegeType] ON [databaseName].[tableName] TO '[username]'@'[host]'
    
  6. For the purposes of the following example, we will give customeradmin full access to the customer database. Issue the following command in the MySQL client:
    1
     GRANT ALL ON customer.* TO 'customeradmin'@'localhost';
    
  7. You may need to specify different access grants depending on the demands of your deployment. Consult the official documentation for MySQL’s GRANT statement. Once the destination database and MySQL user have been created, you can close the MySQL client with the following command:
    1
     quit
    
  8. You can now use the mysql command to restore your SQL file. The form of this command resembles the following:
    1
     mysql -u [username] -p[password] -h [host] [databaseName] < [filename].sql
    

In the following example, we will restore the customer database from a SQL backup file named customerBackup.sql (pay special attention to the < symbol in this command):

1
mysql -u root -p -h localhost customer < customerBackup.sql

You will be prompted for the root MySQL user’s password. Once the correct credentials are supplied, the restoration process will begin. The duration of this operation depends on your system’s load and the size of the database that you are restoring. It may complete in a few seconds, or it may take many hours.

Restoring a Single Table from Backup

Option 1: Restoring a Single Table Using the MySQL and Backups Created by mysqldump

Before beginning the restoration process, we assume that your MySQL instance already has an existing database that can receive the table you wish to restore. If your MySQL instance does not have the required database, we’ll need to create it before proceeding. First, log into your MySQL instance with the following command:

1
mysql -u root -p -h localhost

You will be prompted for the root MySQL user’s password. After you have provided the correct credentials, you must create the destination database. For the purpose of this example we will create the customer database and exit the mysql prompt by issuing the following statements:

1
2
CREATE DATABASE customer;
    quit

If you already have the required database, you can safely skip the above step. To continue with the table restoration, issue a command in the following form:

1
mysql -u [username] -p[password] -h [host] [databaseName] < [filename].sql

For the following, example, we will restore the order table into the existing customer database from an SQL backup file named customerOrderBackup.sql. Be very careful to use the < operator in the following command:

1
mysql -u root -p -h localhost customer < customerOrderBackup.sql

You will be prompted for the root MySQL user’s password. Once the correct credentials are supplied, the restoration process will begin. The duration of this operation depends on your system’s load and the size of the table that you are restoring. It may complete in a few seconds, or it may take many hours.

Option 2: Restoring a Single Table Using the MySQL Client and an INFILE Statement for Backups Created with OUTFILE

Before beginning the restoration process, we assume that your MySQL instance already has an existing database that can receive the table you wish to restore. If your MySQL instance does not have the required database, we’ll need to create it before proceeding. First, log into your MySQL instance with the following command:

1
mysql -u root -p -h localhost

You will be prompted for the root MySQL user’s password. After you have provided the correct credentials, you must create the destination database. For the purpose of this example we will create the customer database and exit the mysql prompt by issuing the following statements:

1
2
CREATE DATABASE customer;
    quit

The data backup used in this case was created using the SELECT * INTO OUTFILE 'backupFile.sql' FROM tableName command. This type of backup only retains the data itself so the table structure must be recreated. To restore a single table from within the MySQL client, you must first prepare the destination database and table. Log in to your (new) MySQL instance using the MySQL client:

1
mysql -u root -p -h localhost

You will be prompted for the root MySQL user’s password. Once the correct credentials are supplied, you must create the destination database. In this case, we will create the customer database. Issue the following statement:

1
CREATE DATABASE customer;

Remember that the semi-colons (e.g. ;) following each statement are required. Now you must create the destination table with the correct structure. The data types of the fields of the table must mirror those of the table where the backup originated. In this example, we will restore the ordertable of the customer database. There are 2 fields in the order table, custNum with data type INTand orderName with data type VARCHAR(20); your table structure will be different:

1
2
USE customer;
CREATE TABLE order (custNum INT, orderName VARCHAR(20));

Depending on your deployment, you may need to create a new MySQL user or recreate a previous user with access to the newly created database. The command for creating a new MySQL user takes the following form:

1
CREATE USER '[username]'@'[host]' IDENTIFIED BY '[password]';

In the next example, we will create a user named customeradmin:

1
CREATE USER 'customeradmin'@'localhost' IDENTIFIED BY 's3cr1t';

Now we will give customeradmin privileges to access the customer database. The command for granting privileges to a database for a specific user takes the following form:

1
GRANT [privilegeType] ON [databaseName].[tableName] TO '[username]'@'[host]'

For the purposes of the following example, we will give customeradmin full access to the customerdatabase. Issue the following command in the MySQL client:

1
GRANT ALL ON customer.* TO 'customeradmin'@'localhost';

You may need to specify different access grants depending on the demands of your deployment. Consult the official documentation for MySQL’s GRANT statement. Once the table and user have been created, we can import the backup data from the backup file using the LOAD DATA command. The syntax resembles the following:

1
LOAD DATA INFILE '[filename]' INTO TABLE [tableName];

In the following, example we will restore data from a table from a file named customerOrderBackup.sql. When MySQL client is given path and filename after INFILE, it looks in the MySQL data directory for that file. If the filename customerOrderBackup.sql was given, the path would be /var/lib/mysql/customerOrderBackup.sql. Ensure that the file you are trying to restore from exists, especially if MySQL generates File not found errors.

To import the data from the customerOrderBackup.sql file located in /var/lib/mysql/, issue the following command:

1
LOAD DATA INFILE 'customerOrderBackup.sql' INTO TABLE order;

This process can take anywhere from a few seconds to many hours depending on the size of your table. The duration of this operation depends on your system’s load and the size of the table that you are restoring. It may complete in a few seconds, or it may take many hours. After you have verified that your data was imported successfully, you can log out:

1
quit

How CloudFlare Increases Speed And Security Of Your Site

ShineServers.Com

CloudFlare, a web performance and security company, is excited to announce our partnership with SHINE SERVERS LLP ! If you haven’t heard about CloudFlare before, our value proposition is simple: we’ll make any website twice as fast and protect it from a broad range of web threats.

Today, hundreds of thousands of websites—ranging from individual blogs to e-commerce sites to the websites of Fortune 500 companies to national governments—use CloudFlare to make their sites faster and more secure. We power more than 65 billion monthly page views—more than Amazon, Wikipedia, Twitter, Zynga, AOL, Apple, Bing, eBay, PayPal and Instagram combined—and over 25% of the Internet’s population regularly passes through our network.

Faster web performance

CloudFlare is designed to take a great hosting platform like SHINE SERVERS LLP and make it even better.

We run 23 data centers [link to http://www.cloudflare.com/network-map] strategically located around the world. When you sign up for CloudFlare, we begin routing your traffic to the nearest data center.

As your traffic passes through the data centers, we intelligently determine what parts of your website are static versus dynamic. The static portions are cached on our servers for a short period of time, typically less than 2 hours before we check to see if they’ve been updated. By automatically moving the static parts of your site closer to your visitors, the overall performance of your site improves significantly.

CloudFlare’s intelligent caching system also means you save bandwidth, which means saving money, and decreases the load on your servers, which means your web application will run faster and more efficiently than ever. On average, CloudFlare customers see a 60% decrease in bandwidth usage, and a 65% in total requests to their servers. The overall effect is that CloudFlare will typically cut the load time for pages on your site by 50% which means higher engagement and happier visitors.

Broad web security

Over the course of 2011, CloudFlare identified a 700% increase in the number of distributed denial of service attacks [link to http://blog.cloudflare.com/2011-the-year-of-the-ddos] (DDoS) we track on the Internet (see the chart below). As attacks like these increase, CloudFlare is stepping up to protect sites.

CloudFlare’s security protections offer a broad range of protections [link to http://www.cloudflare.com/features-security] against attacks such as DDoS, hacking or spam submitted to a blog or comment form. What is powerful about our approach is that the system gets smarter the more sites that are part of the CloudFlare community. We analyze the traffic patterns of hundreds of millions of visitors in real time and adapt the security systems to ensure good traffic gets through and bad traffic is stopped.

In time, our goal is nothing short of making attacks against websites a relic of history. And, given our scale and the billions of different attacks we see and adapt to every year, we’re well on our way to achieving that for sites on the CloudFlare network.

Signing up

Any website can deploy CloudFlare, regardless of your underlying platform. By integrating closely with SHINE SERVERS LLP, we make the process of setting up CloudFlare “1 click easy” through your existing SHINE SERVERS LLP [control panel] dashboard. Just look for the CloudFlare icon, choose the domain you want to enable, and click the orange cloud. That’s it!

We’ve kept the price as low as possible and plans offered through SHINE SERVERS LLP are free. Moreover, we never charge you for bandwidth or storage, therefore saving you tons via reduced bandwidth costs.

For site owners who would like to take advantage of CloudFlare’s advanced offerings, we also offer a ‘Pro’ tier of service for $20/month [link to http://www.cloudflare.com/plans]. The ‘Pro’ tier includes all of the ‘Free’ tier’s offerings, as well as extra features like SSL, full web application firewall and faster analytics.

We’re proud that every day more than a thousand new sites, including some of the largest on the web, join the CloudFlare community. If you’re looking for a faster, safer website, you’ve got a good start with SHINE SERVERS LLP, but the next step is to join the CloudFlare community.

How You Can Help In Nepal Relief Effort

As a CEO & Founder at Shine Servers LLP, i’ll be arranging some donation for supporting Nepal Relief Effort for the people effected by #NepalEarthquake tomorrow. We are not a heavy earning company but as a #Entreprneurs we can always donate a small fraction of our earnings for the people who are fighting for their survival with the Natural Calamities.

Uday Foundation​ is sending medicines and essential supplies to Nepal and is working with local organizations to ensure their urgent distribution. Medical camps will also be organised soon.

Urgent Relief Material

Dry Ration
Tents
Matches and Candles
Tarpaulins and thick plastic sheets
Blankets and Sleeping Bags
Feeding bottles
Baby Food
Sanitary napkins
Essential Medicine
Feeding bottles

Financial Assistance Details

For Online Transfers:

Bank name: HDFC Bank
Branch: Anand Niketan, New Delhi 110021
Account name: UDAY FOUNDATION FOR CDRBG TRUST
Type: Savings
A/c No. 03361450000251
IFSC Code HDFC0000336

Cheques can be made in favour of “UDAY FOUNDATION FOR CDRBG TRUST” and sent at following address:

Uday Foundation,
113A/1, (Near Govardhan Resturant), Adhchini, Sri Aurobindo Marg,
New Delhi 110017 Phone: 011-26561333/444

Since Uday Foundation is not registered with FCRA so they cannot accept foreign donations, they accepts donations from Non-Resident Indians only through any bank account operational in India. Contributions made by a citizen of India living in another country, from his personal savings, through the normal banking channels, is not treated as foreign contribution.

Please share the details after you have made the donation to help@udayfoundationindia.org, along with your complete address and PAN card no, enabling us to send a 80G tax exemption receipt of the same.

Drop-off Location

Uday Foundation
113A, Sri Aurobindo Marg, New Delhi 110017
Phone : 011-26561333/444, Mobile : 9868125819
Email : info@udayfoundationindia.org

 

Note: This information has been provided/published on a good faith basis, without any commercial motive. Shine Servers LLP does not vouch for the authenticity of the claims made by the intending donee, nor can we guarantee that the donations made by a donor will be used for the purpose as stated by the intending donee. You are requested to independently verify the contact information and other details before making a donation. Shine Servers LLP and/or its employees will not be responsible for the same.

 

Highest Regards,
Bharat Vashist

CEO & Founder
Shine Servers LLP || Leaders In Servers
www.shineservers.com || www.shineservers.in
……………………………………………………………………………………………………..
twitter: @shineservers || Facebook : https://www.facebook.com/ShineServers

WordPress 4.1.2 Released – Critical Security Update

Shine Servers LOGO

WordPress

Security Updates Issued

An update for WordPress was just released to address various security vulnerabilities and it is recommended that you update as soon as possible.

Official Link:

https://wordpress.org/news/2015/04/wordpress-4-1-2/

Source
1 2 3 28