How to install an SSL certificate on IIS 10

SSL installation in IIS 10 requires one certificate file with the .p7b (or .cer) file extension. You may either download the issued certificate in the email delivered by Comodo (now Sectigo) or download it in your SSLs.com account following these instructions.

In order to install the certificate, please follow the steps below.

  1. Press Win + R and type “inetmgr” in the appeared window to run the Internet Information Services (IIS) Manager.
  2. On the IIS Manager home page, locate the “Server Certificates” icon and double-click it:
  3. Locate the “Actions” panel on the right side and click “Complete Certificate Request”:

4. In the “Specify Certificate Authority Response” window, perform the actions below.

a) In the “File name containing the certification authority’s response” field, browse the file system to select your .p7b (or .cer) certificate.
b) In the “Friendly name” field, specify any name that will help you to identify the certificate among other files. It is best to submit the actual domain name of the certificate.
c) In the “Select a certificate store for the new certificate” field, leave the default value “Personal”.

5. Click “OK” to import the certificate to the server storage.

6. Once the import is completed, in the “Server Certificates” window, you will see a new entry associated with the imported certificate:

7. Assign the certificate to your website by expanding the “Sites” subsection in the “Connections” menu on the left and select the corresponding site. Then, in the “Actions” panel on the right side, locate the “Edit Site” menu and select the “Bindings” option:

8. On the right side of the “Site Bindings” window, click “Add”:

9. In the “Add Site Binding” window, modify the fields as below:

a) In the “Type” field, select “https”.

b) In the “IP address” field, select your website’s IP address or “All Unassigned”.

c) In the “Port” field, specify “443” (default).

d) In the “SSL certificate” field, select the previously imported certificate, which can be identified by the friendly name:

NOTE: The “Require Server Name Indication” box needs to be checked if there are multiple SSL certificates on the server.

10. Click “OK” in order for the new “https” entry to appear in the “Site Bindings” window:

That’s all – the certificate should now be installed and the website should be accessible via HTTPS.

The SSL installation status can be checked online via the SSL checker at https://decoder.link/sslchecker.

How to install an SSL certificate on IIS8

After the certificate is activated, validated and issued, it needs to be installed by completing the request generated previously with the file received from the Certificate Authority. The process is described below:

  1. Download the certificate in PKCS#7 format in your SSLs.com account and upload it to the server. The certificate can be also downloaded from the email received from the CA. Please unzip the archive and find the .p7b/.cer certificate file there.
  2. Open Internet Information Services (IIS) Manager and double-click on the “Server Certificates” icon. Then click on “Complete Certificate Request” in the “Actions” section:
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3. On the next screen it is necessary to fill in three fields:

1) File name containing the certification authority’s response– full path to the .p7b or .cer certificate file received from the Certificate Authority. It can be found the file system by clicking on “…” button;

2) Friendly name– general name for a certain certificate request. The domain name should be specified here to avoid confusion with other requests;

3) Select a certificate store for the new certificate – select “Personal” from the drop-down menu.

Once all fields are filled, click “Ok”. Now the certificate will appear in the “Server Certificates” storage.

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4. After that, it is necessary to create a binding for the website to be available via HTTPS. Go to the “Sites” folder in the “Connections” section in the left part of the screen and double-click on the necessary website:

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5. In the right corner of the screen, click on the “Bindings” button in the “Actions” section:

https://i0.wp.com/helpdesk.ssls.com/hc/article_attachments/115000774169/9.png?w=525&ssl=1

6. In the new “Site Bindings” window, click “Add…”:

https://i0.wp.com/helpdesk.ssls.com/hc/article_attachments/115000774189/10.png?w=525&ssl=1

7. Fill in the following fields in the “Add Site Binding” menu:

1) Type select “https” from the dropdown;

2) IP address– choose “All Unassigned” or choose IP address from the dropdown;

3) Port –  specify a custom port number for secured connection, or use the default port 443;

4) SSL certificate – select the completed certificate request by its friendly name.

It is recommended to check the “Require Server Name Indication” box as it allows multiple SSL certificates to be installed on the server. Once all the necessary information is specified, click “Ok”.

https://i0.wp.com/helpdesk.ssls.com/hc/article_attachments/115000774209/11.png?w=525&ssl=1

8. A new binding will appear in the “Site Bindings” section: 

https://i1.wp.com/helpdesk.ssls.com/hc/article_attachments/115000774229/12.png?w=525&ssl=1

9. Now the website should be available via HTTPS. You can check if it is installed correctly here.

A Beginner’s Guide To Bitcoin Crypto Currency

Bitcoin is the world’s first internet-based currency. It’s worth knowing about, but is it worth accepting as a method of payment?

What exactly is Bitcoin?

Imagine a currency that has no central bank owning or underwriting it, and its value can double within a few months. Imagine a currency that doesn’t exist in any physical form, with ATMs that only allow you to pay in funds instead of paying out. Imagine a currency where every transaction is recorded in an open source ledger, yet those transactions are completely anonymous, with no proof of who bought what from whom.

Sounds ridiculous, doesn’t it? Yet Bitcoin is already with us. It was launched in 2009, though nobody has ever admitted to developing it. It can be bought, exchanged for goods and services, or earned by volunteering to host payment processing software. Known as blockchain, the software creates an indelible and publicly-visible ledger of transactions. In theory, tracking the movement of each Bitcoin transaction eliminates fraud, though there have been a couple of high-profile bitcoin thefts in recent years.

A Full Purse

With no physical evidence of ownership, Bitcoin is stored in an electronic wallet. It’s important to choose your wallet carefully, since some of the advertised options are elaborate scams designed to fleece unwary people out of their money. Such mystique has made bitcoin the payment method of choice for the internet’s more disreputable citizens. Each transaction is secured with cryptographic keys that preserve the anonymity of each party, much like the end-to-end encryption on normal ecommerce transactions.

Each Bitcoin has been divided into one hundred million fragments. A fragment is known as a Satoshi, after bitcoin’s reputed founder. That means a Satoshi is presently worth just 0.00265 cents. Nobody knows why 100,000,000 was chosen to be bitcoin’s subunit, and there’s also confusion over a rumor that there will only ever be 21 million bitcoin in circulation. One form of speculation has led to another, with bitcoin’s value fluctuating wildly on global stock markets. In May, it lost 19%t of its value in four days. Yet two days later, one financial analyst predicted it could increase in value by almost 3,500%t within a decade. That would make one bitcoin worth $100,000, compared to its current value of around $2,650.

Investing in Bitcoin – As a Buyer and Seller

So, a virtual currency with no underwriters, associations with criminals, a dubious past and no market controls on its value beyond speculative shareholders. You might think Bitcoin is best avoided. Yet it actually offers some fairly compelling advantages. With new currency gradually released as blockchain calculations payout for work completed, it’s protected from state-level tinkering like devaluation or quantitative easing.

In terms of ecommerce, Bitcoin is a great option. It incurs no processing fees, unlike credit cards. It’s a global currency with no exchange rates, which means customers on any continent pay the same price. Because it’s entirely digital, it dovetails with the internet much better than unwieldy paper currencies. Bitcoin’s anonymity means there’s no need to handle or store sensitive customer data. And transactions can’t be reversed, so a sale is guaranteed.

Perhaps most significantly, accepting Bitcoin on an ecommerce site gives your company a real USP. In today’s mature ecommerce marketplace, it represents a great way to attract new customers – while outshining less forward-thinking rivals…

 

Source

How To Block A Domain From Sending Email From My cPanel Server

We face this problem many times, even we mostly get this kind of issue when a user who is getting hacked a lot and the account is sending out spam emails. In that case, If you want to disable just his account from being able to send mail at all until he can get his script updated or changed. So here’s how we can do it:

First, in root SSH, run these commands:

touch /etc/blockeddomains
echo “domain.com” >> /etc/blockeddomains

Please replace domain.com with the domain name. Do not replace the “” part as that’s required, only the domain.com part with the right domain name.

In WHM > Exim Configuration Editor > Advanced Configuration Editor -> Click on “Add additional configuration setting” -> Add::

domainlist blocked_domains = lsearch;/etc/blockeddomains

Locate the “ROUTERS CONFIGURATION” section, and right below these lines:

democheck:
driver = redirect
require_files = “+/etc/demouids”
condition = “${if eq {${lookup {$originator_uid} lsearch {/etc/demouids} {$value}}}{}{false}{true}}”
allow_fail
data = :fail: demo accounts are not permitted to relay email

Put the following lines:

reject_domains:

driver = redirect
# RBL Blacklist incoming hosts
domains = blocked_domains
allow_fail
data = :fail: Connection rejected: SPAM source $domain is manually blacklisted.

How To Setup Virtualisation With KVM On A CentOS (SolusVM Slave)

Steps To Setup:

Part 1 – Disk Setup

Fdisk is the most commonly used command to check the partitions on a disk. The fdisk command can display the partitions and details like file system type. However it does not report the size of each partitions.

$ sudo fdisk -l

You cannot create a Linux partition larger than 2 TB using the fdisk command. The fdisk won’t create partitions larger than 2 TB. This is fine for desktop and laptop users, but on server you need a large partition. For example, you cannot create 3TB or 4TB partition size (RAID based) using the fdisk command. It will not allow you to create a partition that is greater than 2TB.

Creating 4 TB Partition Size

To create a partition start GNU parted as follows:

$ parted /dev/sdb

Creates a new Partition Table:

$ (parted) mklabel gpt

Next, set the default unit to TB, enter:

$ (parted) unit TB

To create a 4 TB partition size, enter:

$ (parted) mkpart primary 0.00TB 4.00TB

To print the current partitions, enter:

$ (parted) print

Quit and save the changes, enter:

$ (parted) quit
Use the mkfs.ext4 command to format the file system: (Optionally You can use mkfs.ext3 if needed)

$ mkfs.ext4 /dev/sdb1
Create the PV through following command:

$ pvcreate /dev/sdb1

You can check that new PV through this command:

$ pvscan

Create the Volume Group:

$ vgcreate -s 32M vg1 /dev/sdb1

You can check that new volume group through this command:

$ vgdisplay
Part 2 – Network Setup

Bridging requires the bridge-utils package to be installed on the server. To check if it’s installed, do the following:

$ rpm -q bridge-utils

If you get an output – it’s installed, if not, it needs installing:

$ yum install bridge-utils

Before setting up your bridge, the contents of /etc/sysconfig/network-scripts/ifcfg-eth0 will look like the following:

DEVICE=eth0
BOOTPROTO=static
BROADCAST=102.100.152.255
HWADDR=00:27:0E:09:0C:B2
IPADDR=102.100.152.2
IPV6INIT=yes
IPV6_AUTOCONF=yes
NETMASK=255.255.255.0
NETWORK=102.100.152.0
ONBOOT=yes

To back up your current ifcfg-eth0 before modification:

1. Run the following command:

$ cp /etc/sysconfig/network-scripts/ifcfg-eth0 /etc/sysconfig/network-scripts/backup-ifcfg-eth0

2.Create the bridge file:

$ nano -w /etc/sysconfig/network-scripts/ifcfg-br0

3. Copy parts of ifcfg-eth0 to it:

DEVICE=br0
TYPE=Bridge
BOOTPROTO=static
BROADCAST=102.100.152.255
IPADDR=102.100.152.2
NETMASK=255.255.255.0
NETWORK=102.100.152.0
ONBOOT=yes

4. Save that file and edit ifcfg-eth0:

$ nano -w /etc/sysconfig/network-scripts/ifcfg-eth0

5. Remove the networking parts and specify the bridge:

DEVICE=eth0
HWADDR=00:27:0E:09:0C:B2
IPV6INIT=yes
IPV6_AUTOCONF=yes
ONBOOT=yes
BRIDGE=br0

6. Bridge is  set up. Make sure that the changes are correct and restart the networking:

$ /etc/init.d/network restart

7. Once it’s restarted you see the new bridge using the ifconfig command:

[[email protected] ~]# ifconfig
br0       Link encap:Ethernet  HWaddr 00:27:0E:09:0C:B2
inet addr:102.100.152.2  Bcast:102.100.152.255  Mask:255.255.255.0
inet6 addr: fe80::227:eff:fe09:cb2/64 Scope:Link
UP BROADCAST RUNNING MULTICAST  MTU:1500  Metric:1
RX packets:48 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 frame:0
TX packets:67 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 carrier:0
collisions:0 txqueuelen:0
RX bytes:2984 (2.9 KiB)  TX bytes:13154 (12.8 KiB)

eth0      Link encap:Ethernet  HWaddr 00:27:0E:09:0C:B2
inet6 addr: fe80::227:eff:fe09:cb2/64 Scope:Link
UP BROADCAST RUNNING MULTICAST  MTU:1500  Metric:1
RX packets:31613 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 frame:0
TX packets:9564 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 carrier:0
collisions:0 txqueuelen:100
RX bytes:2981335 (2.8 MiB)  TX bytes:2880868 (2.7 MiB)
Memory:d0700000-d0720000

 

Part 3 – Installing a SolusVM KVM Slave:

In SSH as root do the following:

$ wget http://soluslabs.com/installers/solusvm/install

$ chmod 755 install

$ ./install

Now, follow the steps as shown in Video.

The install will now do it’s work.You will get next output (output text may vary)

Once the installer is complete you will be presented with the slave keys and any further instructions for your install type.